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Articles Tagged with Edward T. Kang

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Clipboard and Chart overlay on modern buildingPiercing the veil of limited liability companies (LLCs) allows a court to disregard the separate corporate personality of the company and its member(s) to reach the assets of the members and hold them liable for all or part of the LLC’s debts under Pennsylvania law.

In the September 3, 2020 edition of The Legal Intelligencer Edward T. Kang, managing member of KHF wrote “Piercing the Corporate Veil of LLCs Under Pennsylvania Law.

Piercing the veil of limited liability companies (LLCs) allows a court to disregard the separate corporate personality of the company and its member(s) to reach the assets of the members and hold them liable for all or part of the LLC’s debts under Pennsylvania law. Previously, I’ve written on the general substantive and procedural requirements of piercing the corporate veil of an entity and alter ego jurisdiction over corporate groups. This column addresses the Pennsylvania law on the doctrine of piercing the corporate veil as applied to LLCs.

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Illustration of computer monitor with six people video chattingPlease join KHF Managing Member Edward T. Kang (panelist) and Member Kandis L. Kovalsky (moderator) for an upcoming CLE, Next-Level ADR — The Future is Now for Arbitration in Complex Cases, during the NAMWOLF Virtual Annual Meeting, on September 16, 2020 from 4:00-5:00 PM ET.

The notable reasons for taking the arbitration route as opposed to heading to the Courthouse have only been exacerbated in recent months. We’ve seen what technology can (and can’t) do, what happens when the courthouse calendar gets further backlogged, and resources are slim. Where is arbitration heading in the legal profession?

Edward and Kandis will be joined by fellow panelists Nelson C. Bellido, Managing Partner of ROIG Lawyers in Miami, Florida; Marcus Wester, Senior Litigation Counsel, Harley-Davidson Motor Company; and Ingeuneal C. Gray, VP, Commercial Division, American Arbitration Association.

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Diverse group of business people with arms foldedA recent decision out of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan underscored the RICO “proximate cause” inquiry highlighting yet another, often overlooked, complexity in litigating such cases.

In the July 23, 2020 edition of The Legal Intelligencer Edward T. Kang, managing member of KHF wrote “Civil RICO and Proximate Cause: A Tool for Defendants and Challenge for Plaintiffs.

In March 2018, I authored a column on civil RICO claims brought under 18 U.S.C. Section 1962(a) and (b). In that space, I explained the complexity of those sections within RICO cases. A recent decision out of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan underscored the RICO “proximate cause” inquiry highlighting yet another, often overlooked, complexity in litigating such cases.

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Laptop with various paper coming out of itWhile it is likely that businesses will think to add force majeure clauses to future contracts, there is also reason to believe the specific language of these clauses could be modified. Likewise, there are other changes to be expected in post-pandemic contracts.

In the July 2, 2020 edition of The Legal Intelligencer Edward T. Kang, managing member of KHF wrote “The Future of Business Contracts Post-COVID-19.

Recently, I authored a column on force majeure clauses. In that space, I explained how many businesses have recently been turning to force majeure clauses in their contracts for protection in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. While it is likely that businesses will think to add force majeure clauses to future contracts, there is also reason to believe the specific language of these clauses could be modified. Likewise, there are other changes to be expected in post-pandemic contracts.

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Businessman in suit on green background.When nonresident members of a corporate group, usually the parent company, should expect to be subjected to the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania courts when one of the entities, usually the subsidiary, is based or does business in the state.

In the June 18, 2020 edition of The Legal Intelligencer Edward T. Kang, managing member of KHF wrote “Piercing the Corporate Veil of Corporate Groups to Establish Alter Ego Jurisdiction.

Last June, in this space, I authored a column about Pennsylvania law on substantive and procedural aspects of piercing the corporate veil of companies to reach the assets of their shareholders or the assets of a parent company in corporate groups. In early January 2020, I wrote a column about the development of Pennsylvania law on establishing personal jurisdiction over registered nonresident businesses since the Supreme Court’s decisions in. In this case, I address the intersection of those two related columns in cases involving corporate groups. That is, when nonresident members of a corporate group, usually the parent company, should expect to be subjected to the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania courts when one of the entities, usually the subsidiary, is based or does business in the state.

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Flyer advertising CLE with panelists, date and timeKHF Managing Member Edward T. Kang and Member Kandis L. Kovalsky are both presenters in an upcoming CLE on the advantages and disadvantages of using arbitration as a resolution mechanism for complex commercial cases. Kandis also serves as Course Planner.

This 3-hour CLE will review the history of arbitration and the United State’s growing trend favoring arbitration. The panel, comprised of experienced practitioners and arbitrators, will discuss the preliminary conference, discovery, awards as well as considerations for increasing the efficiency in arbitration. Continue reading →

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Kang Haggerty & Fetbroyt Members Edward T. Kang, Jacklyn Fetbroyt and Kandis L. Kovalsky are attending the 2020 National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms (“NAMWOLF”) Driving Diversity & Leadership Conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida from February 22nd to February 25th. Continue reading →

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When ALM’s The Legal Intelligencer, also published online at Law.com, convened their annual Roundtable Discussion on Diversity and Inclusion efforts, they turned to Kang Haggerty & Fetbroyt (KHF) managing member Edward T. Kang to serve as moderator.

The roundtable originally appeared in the October 15, 2019 edition of The Legal Intelligencer, and is available to read online at Law.com.

Besides his own first-hand experiences as a diverse lawyer, and leader of a minority-owned law firm in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Kang and his firm are active members of the National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms (NAMWOLF). KHF is also certified as a Minority-Owned Business Enterprise by the Eastern Minority Supplier Development Council.

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NAPABA-300x300KHF managing member Edward T. Kang and associate Kandis L. Kovalsky are both presenters at an upcoming CLE on emerging issues in Emoji Law as part of the 2019 National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) Annual Convention, taking place in Austin, Texas, November 7-10. They will be joined by Elaine Edralin Pascua of TrueBlue, Inc. and Carolyn Enciso Sieve of Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete, LLP. Ireno A. Reuss III will serve as moderator. The program will take place on Friday, November 8th from 1:30 – 2:45 PM.

Emoji use is increasing, and courts—like us—are learning how to interpret them in the context of a trial, in the workplace, and in a plethora of practice areas. Continue reading →

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Kang Haggerty & Fetbroyt Members Edward T. Kang and Jacklyn Fetbroyt, along with Associate Kandis L. Kovalsky, are attending the 2019 National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms (“NAMWOLF”) Annual Meeting & Law Firm Expo.

If you are attending the NAMWOLF Annual Meeting, or find yourself in the greater L.A. area, come by to say hello to Edward, Jackie and Kandis.

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Edward T. Kang

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