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Articles Tagged with New York

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With Complaints Rapidly Increasing across the U.S., Now is the time to act

As of May 26, 2020, 2,278 complaints have been filed nationwide over the global pandemic COVID-19 according to the COVID-19 Complaint Tracker developed by lawyers at Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP. While the largest amount of these complaints deal with prison conditions and civil rights , the next highest areas of litigation involve insurance disputes, consumer disputes, labor and employment issues  and contract disputes. Claims regarding employment, contracts and force majeure provisions, or clauses contained in contracts which excuse performance due to natural destructive acts also known as “acts of God,” are on the rise. These complaints will continue to be filed as the effects of COVID-19 continue to be felt in ever-changing ways. Many of these complaints have been filed in jurisdictions where KHF regularly practices—namely COVID-19 hot spots New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Continue reading ›

In the September 6, 2018 edition of The Legal Intelligencer, Edward Kang, Managing Member of KHF, and Tianna Kalogerakis, Associate of KHF, co-authored “Borrowing Statute: NY’s Bar to the Unsuspecting, Out-of-State Investor.”

Despite the plaintiff-friendly pleading standards for securities fraud outlined by the Supreme Court in Merck & Co. v. Reynolds, 130 S. Ct. 1784 (2010), out-of-state investors need to be particularly vigilant in pursuing fraud-related common law claims in New York, being careful not to become blocked by the borrowing statute.

New York City is home to the world’s largest stock exchange, the New York Stock Exchange, and is host to financial service providers. This concentration of wealth and financial expertise has enticed many out-of-state investors to place their money in securities with New York-based financial institutions in the prospect of riches; however, coupled with the influx of these out-of-state investments is the potential for legal action by each dissatisfied or defrauded investor.  New York developed the “borrowing statute” to protect its residents and deter actions by nonresidents including out-of-state investors in securities and commodities. Despite the plaintiff-friendly pleading standards for securities fraud outlined by the Supreme Court in Merck & Co. v. Reynolds, 130 S. Ct. 1784 (2010), out-of-state investors need to be particularly vigilant in pursuing fraud-related common law claims in New York, being careful not to become blocked by the borrowing statute.

The State University of New York has reached a deal with unions and Northern Brooklyn community groups regarding the future of its Long Island College Hospital.

In February of 2013, SUNY’s board of trustees voted to close the hospital and were seeking sell the property to (likely one of four) developers who are competing in a bid process.  Various groups from the community blocked the closure with a web of legal actions brought by a coalition of local community groups, unions and elected officials, who were calling for a totally new, transparent Request for Proposals (bidding) process that “respond to the health care needs of the community.”  Meanwhile, SUNY claimed that the losses—estimated at as much as $13MM per month—that resulted from the hospital’s continued operation threaten the structure of the state’s entire public college system. Continue reading ›

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