Articles Posted in Edward T. Kang

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When ALM’s The Legal Intelligencer, also published online at Law.com, convened their annual Roundtable Discussion on Diversity and Inclusion efforts, they turned to Kang Haggerty & Fetbroyt (KHF) managing member Edward T. Kang to serve as moderator.

The roundtable originally appeared in the October 15, 2019 edition of The Legal Intelligencer, and is available to read online at Law.com.

Besides his own first-hand experiences as a diverse lawyer, and leader of a minority-owned law firm in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Kang and his firm are active members of the National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms (NAMWOLF). KHF is also certified as a Minority-Owned Business Enterprise by the Eastern Minority Supplier Development Council.

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NAPABA-300x300KHF managing member Edward T. Kang and associate Kandis L. Kovalsky are both presenters at an upcoming CLE on emerging issues in Emoji Law as part of the 2019 National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) Annual Convention, taking place in Austin, Texas, November 7-10. They will be joined by Elaine Edralin Pascua of TrueBlue, Inc. and Carolyn Enciso Sieve of Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete, LLP. Ireno A. Reuss III will serve as moderator. The program will take place on Friday, November 8th from 1:30 – 2:45 PM.

Emoji use is increasing, and courts—like us—are learning how to interpret them in the context of a trial, in the workplace, and in a plethora of practice areas. Continue reading →

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Kang Haggerty & Fetbroyt Members Edward T. Kang and Jacklyn Fetbroyt, along with Associate Kandis L. Kovalsky, are attending the 2019 National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms (“NAMWOLF”) Annual Meeting & Law Firm Expo.

If you are attending the NAMWOLF Annual Meeting, or find yourself in the greater L.A. area, come by to say hello to Edward, Jackie and Kandis.

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Edward T. Kang

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Webinar-FlyerKHF managing member Edward T. Kang and associate Kandis L. Kovalsky are both faculty members for the upcoming webinar, “The Complex Commercial Case in Arbitration,” sponsored by the American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division Litigation Committee as part of the ABA YLD’s 2019 Litigation Week webinar series. The July 22nd program will take place from 1-2 pm ET and is free of charge and open to the public, but does require advance registration. Kovalsky will serve as program moderator. Kang, a litigator and AAA arbitrator, will serve on a panel discussion that will tackle difficult questions such as how does the arbitration forum balance giving the parties access to enough discovery for a fair hearing while maintaining its core principles of efficiency? What happens when one party wants thorough discovery and another does not? Register for this free webinar here.

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“As part of my business divorce practice, I often represent one owner against other owners. People who may have once been close friends or family members now turn into ugly, bitter enemies. What started as a company with shared goals and vision has dissipated into a pool of litigation,” writes KHF managing member Edward T. Kang in the March 2019 edition of the American Bar Association’s Law Practice Today (LPT) webzine. In Finding a Niche Defending against Business Betrayals, Kang discusses his firm’s niche practice representing Officers and Directors in these often-complicated business disputes. Continue reading →

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In the July 2018 edition of the American Bar Association’s Law Practice Today (LPT), KHF managing member Edward T. Kang is featured in the Meet the Managing Partner column. LPT, a monthly publication of the ABA’s Law Practice Division, is distributed to nearly 500,000 lawyers and law students across the globe each month, including all members of the ABA. This month’s issue is devoted to the theme of diversity and inclusion. Learn more at www.lawpracticetoday.com.

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1. What is a Whistleblower?

A whistleblower is a person who, on behalf of the federal government, state government or governmental authority, reports illegal, fraudulent or dishonest conduct by a person or an organization.

2. Importance of Internal Whistleblowers:

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1. Compile a small list of attorneys that you find. It’s okay to start with an entire page of attorneys, but narrow down the list by asking friends, family, and business connections their opinions. Figure out if there are any attorneys you should consider or avoid.

2. Do a background check on the attorneys on your list. Use resources like Martindale-Hubbell, Avvo, Lawyers.com, the American Bar Association, and many other sources on the internet, including news articles. Here are some questions to consider as you do your search:

a. Has the attorney been cited for any ethics violations?

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As a business owner, you want to make sure that your company successfully continues for generations to come. So, when you eventually retire or step down from your position, it is important to consider how you want to proceed with passing on your business to the next generation. Consider the following five tips.

1. Highlight your goals. Do you plan on passing your business down to your family, or do you prefer to transition to a buyer? Figure out your goals behind transitioning your business well before you intend to pass on your business. You should give yourself ample time to prepare for any obstacles along the way.

2. Create a clear strategy. Create a clear exit plan strategy as you move forward with the transition. Always be sure you have this plan set before you start so you do not run into confusion while transitioning. Consider the following to include in your strategy as you prepare:

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When considering creating a social media policy, it is important to keep in mind that you will never be able to completely control social media use by your employees. There are, however, a few ways that you can successfully create a social media policy that will allow you to place legal boundaries around media use.

1. Create a Policy and BE Informative: Notify your Employees that you are creating a policy. Keeping them informed mitigates future “I didn’t know” excuses. Also, employees have the legal right to be informed about any new policy change or creation.

2. BE Informed: Before you start drafting anything, be informed about recent legislation regarding Social Media policies and cases that have created different interpretations of existing policies. Three major examples are:

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